A boy holding up a poster promoting global peacebuilding initiatives.

An Investor’s Lesson to Entrepreneurs

Business has the power to impact society for the better. But that doesn't mean entrepreneurs can't go wrong—and investors know that. Entrepreneur and venture capitalist Doug Mellinger shares some tips for realizing meaningful change.

Investing & Diversity: The Changing Faces of Venture Capitalists

Is the venture capital industry embracing diversity in investors? Watch global venture capitalists from around the world discuss the state of things and what needs to be done for a more inclusive future.

Servant Leadership

There's more to leadership than driving a team to profit. In fact, there's a word for looking beyond self-interest to prioritize individual growth: servant leadership. Try this course for a quick breakdown of what that is, how it works, and how it can lead to organizational success.

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

Ever wonder what makes a great leader? Whether your role requires leadership or not, understanding organizational behavior is useful for your career. This course from GLOBIS Unlimited can set you on your way.

Leadership vs. Management

Leadership and management are different skills, but today’s leaders must have both. Try out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to understand the difference, as well as when and why each skill is necessary for motivation, communication, and value.

Strategy: Creating Value Inside Your Company

Have you ever wondered why certain companies are more successful than others? The answer is strategy: internal processes that control costs, allocate resources, and create value. This course from GLOBIS Unlimited can give you the tools you need for that strategic edge.

Strategy: Understanding the External Environment

To plan strategy on any level, you need to understand your company's external environment. In fact, your level of understanding can impact hiring, budgeting, marketing, or nearly any other part of the business world. Want to learn how to do all that? This course from GLOBIS Unlimited is the perfect first step!

Using Japanese Values to Thrive in Global Business

Japanese companies have unique cultural, communication, and operational challenges. But they also have values that have led to remarkable longevity. Check out this seminar to hear how these values help earn trust from overseas head offices and develop employees.

Turnaround Leadership: The Differences Between Japan and the West

What's the best way for leaders to communicate a shift in corporate strategy? How do you even know when it's time for such a change? This course explains how Japan might have one answer, Western companies another.

Conflict Management

Conflicts in the workplace are inevitable. But they can lead to positive outcomes if they’re managed well. Check out this online course for a two-step process that can help you manage conflict successfully.

Evernote Founder: How Tech Startups Can Break through in Japan

Can startup models from Hollywood and Silicon Valley succeed anywhere? Phil Libin, cofounder and CEO of startup incubator All Turtles, explains how AI can solve everyday problems to bring products to market.

Women Empowerment: Lessons from Cartier

How can women overcome gender inequality and reach their leadership goals? Cartier Japan CEO June Miyachi shares her secret in this special course from GLOBIS Unlimited.

Marketing: Reaching Your Target

Every company works hard to get its products into the hands of customers. Are you doing everything you can to compete? In this course, you’ll find a winning formula to turn a product idea into real sales. Follow along through the fundamentals of the marketing mix and see how companies successfully bring products to market.

Marketing Mix

Seeing good products into the hands of customers is no easy task. The marketing mix can help. It's a collection of strategies and tactics companies utilize to get customers to purchase their products or services, and is an essential part of the overall marketing process.

The Principles of Negotiation

With the proper skills and attitude, anyone can become a successful negotiator.  But first, you'll need to learn the basics to prepare for, assess, and respond to offers for the best results. GLOBIS Unlimited can help.

Negotiation: Creating Value

Want to create more shared value between yourself and your negotiation opponent? Discover how cognitive bias affects the judgment of others. Try this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to master the value of negotiation.

Finding Your Life Purpose with Ikigai

Ikigai can guide you in your quest for self-discovery. Listen to Japanese brain scientist Ken Mogi explain why and how.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Want to leverage Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a leader? Try this short course to see how the theory can be applied in practical work scenarios.

Confirmation Bias

We all subconsciously collect information that reinforces our preconceptions. It's natural . . . but it does lead to a kind of flawed decision-making called confirmation bias. To become more objective and impartial, check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited!

An Investor's Lesson to Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurs have the power to transform societies for the better. But how do you attract investors to start or grow a business? Or to sell one? Check out this seminar for the answers to these and more, straight from a master venture capitalist!

Managerial Accounting

Managerial accounting is a powerful way to measure progress, identify problems, and meet your goals. Check out this course to learn how data-backed decisions can help you run your business.

Finance Basics: 1

For a healthy mix of quantitative planning, evaluation, and management, you need solid decision-making. And finance is the secret sauce! Get the essentials of finance in this two-part course from GLOBIS Unlimited.

Basic Accounting: Financial Analysis

Want to compare your performance vs. a competitor? Or evaluate a potential vendor? Then you'll need to conduct a financial analysis. This course will teach you how to use three financial statements and evaluate financial performance in terms of profitability, efficiency, soundness, growth, and overall strength.

Career Anchors

What drives you to be good at your job?

Career anchors are based on your values, desires, motivations, and abilities. They are the immovable parts of your professional self-image that guide you throughout your career journey.

Try this short GLOBIS Unlimited course to identify which of the eight career anchors is yours!

Digital Marketing Psychology to Transform Your Business

How does digital marketing really differ from traditional marketing? How is social media changing things really? And what's going on in Asia?

Pyramid Structure

Having the pyramid structure in your communication toolkit can not only help you approach a problem, but convince others that your solution is valid. Break away from linear thinking and test your logical thinking with this course from GLOBIS Unlimited!

Leadership with Passion through Kokorozashi

The key ingredient to success? Passion.

Finding your kokorozashi will unify your passions and skills to create positive change in society. This GLOBIS Unlimited course will help you develop the values and lifelong goals you need to become a strong, passion-driven leader.

AI First Companies – Implementation and Impact

AI is changing the way companies operate. How do you structure teams to increase efficiency?

Technovate in the Era of Industry 4.0

Is Industry 4.0 is the next step of human evolution human civilization? Dr. Jorge Calvo seems to think so. Join him to learn how the past can help you set goals for an exciting future of digital innovation.

Technovate Thinking

Business leaders of tomorrow need to harness the power of technology and innovation. That means understanding algorithms and how they drive business results. Discover opportunities to make technology work for your competitive edge.

Product Life Cycle

Every product takes a natural course through the market—there's a how, when, and why customers adopt products at different stages. Check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to find out how a product you use every day is part of this cycle.

Logic Tree

Logical thinking is the most valuable asset any business professional can have. That's why logic trees are such a valuable tool—they can help you identify a problem, break it down, and build it back up to a solution.

MECE Principle

Using the MECE principle can help ensure you categorize without gaps or overlaps. Check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited for a practical demonstration of how it works!

Peace is often taken for granted in developed countries like Japan. But in the world at large, the number of people fleeing violent conflict in their home country hit a record high in 2019. That’s four years after the United Nations set a goal to achieve “peace, justice, and strong institutions” as its sixteenth Sustainable Development Goal (known as SDG 16) in 2015.

According to a report by the PeaceNexus Foundation, “84% of investors and ratings agencies considered SDG 16 as ‘(very) relevant’ for companies to report on.” And yet, the tendency to prioritize other goals—such as ROI—remains.

How do you start changing minds and priorities in the business world? Moe Sasaki, a project coordination consultant and peace dialogue facilitator with the UN, has thoughts on how you can shift the approach of your organization and help change the world.

Ms. Moe Sasaki project coordination consultant and peacebuilding facilitator with the UN.
Ms. Moe Sasaki, project coordination consultant and peace dialogue facilitator with the UN.

Peacebuilding, Starting from the Individual

Sasaki spent her childhood in seven different countries across three continents, including Rwanda—a nation infamous for the 1994 genocide that resulted in the death of over 800,000 Rwandans, many of whom belonged to the Tutsi ethnic group. As her father worked to promote reconciliation between the Hutu and Tutsi people, she was quite literally raised in the peacebuilding field.

Early exposure to conflict and segregated communities left a lasting impact on Sasaki. “As a child,” she recalls, “I spent a lot of time with people from all sorts of backgrounds in Rwanda. Some were widows of genocide perpetrators, some were genocide victims themselves, and some were former prisoners. As a child, I was naive to these things. I didn’t care about their past or where they came from—I simply saw them as uncles and aunts.”

Later, as a university student, Sasaki continued to learn the importance of peaceful dialogue working with Peace Boat, a Japanese NGO that promotes peace, human rights, and sustainability through global voyages. Once, while facilitating a dialogue between Korean, Chinese, and Japanese nationals, Sasaki interpreted for an elderly man who shared a harrowing story about his brother. The brother, shipwrecked on his return from Japan’s colonization of Korea, was saved by a Korean fisherman. This story of compassion between people from warring nations had a profound effect on Sasaki.

“There are difficult issues that still linger between Japan and Korea from past wars,” she says. “But all of us listened to the old man’s story and thought that if there were people willing to help each other regardless of nationality during the war… why can’t we be like that now?’”

A single humanitarian act by a Korean fisherman not only saved a life, but also inspired peace among others generations later. Sasaki hopes to encourage further reconciliation through similar stories and dialogue. It’s a personal mission that aligns seamlessly with the UN’s SDG 16. But individual passion is one thing. Is it possible for corporations to take an active role in peacebuilding?

Sasaki believes it is—if business leaders are willing to innovate their approach, find the right peacebuilding partners, and set proper metrics for success.

Members of a reconciliation program greet a peacebuilding tour with song and dance.
Members of a Rwandan reconciliation program greet a peacebuilding tour lead by Ms. Sasaki with song and dance.

4 Ways to Create Successful Corporate-Peacebuilder Partnerships

For a long time, social impact from organizations meant corporate social responsibility (CSR), at best. Over time, CSR has evolved into creating social value (CSV). But moving the corporate mindset away from ROI remains an obstacle—and for good reason. Corporations have a responsibility to investors and shareholders to prove their worth.

Sasaki says it’s possible to move the needle on SDG 16 without letting those stakeholders down—and she has several ideas for how to do it.

Build a peaceful culture from the inside out.

If your company wants to be a part of global peacebuilding efforts, start from within. Sasaki stresses that monetarily investing in NPOs, charities, and other organizations still has value, but if you’re looking for something truly transformational and sustainable, practice what you preach.

“Invest in a business culture that is internally peaceful,” she says. “This would then naturally result in the promotion of a more peaceful culture externally.”

There’s really no downside here—better conflict resolution inevitably leads to a stronger culture and improves buy-in for corporate activities from stakeholders.

Sasaki adds one more benefit: “Through this investment in their own people, corporations build trust and supportive relations with peacebuilding organizations.”

Set new metrics for measuring success.

Once you do decide it’s time to start looking outward, make sure your expectations for impact are practical. Sasaki warns that peace building is, by definition, unpredictable. An attempt to apply classic, steady business metrics will likely leave you disappointed.

“In all aspects of business, you’re expected to demonstrate your achievements with data,” admits Sasaki, “But when it comes to these social programs, you sometimes cannot predict the results. That makes it difficult to get business-minded people to believe in what you’re doing. With our current economic model, investors need to see results on a clear timeline, but peacebuilding often involves serendipity and unseen innovation.”

Communicate with your partners in these initiatives to ensure you have a clear understanding of how things have worked in the past, how they might be improved, and how you should measure “success” going forward.

Be a partner, not a dictator.

Startups seeking funding are often cautioned about going with the first investor who gives them the time of day. To build fruitful, lasting relationships, it’s best to ensure an alignment of vision and mission. You don’t just want any partner—you want the right partner.

The same goes for peacebuilding organizations seeking corporate partners.

Sasaki cites this as a common friction point: “Many peacebuilding organizations choose not to accept funding from corporations and instead opt for funding from trusted grants, individuals, and religious institutions they are affiliated with.”

Why? Because corporate donations often come with strings attached. Talk to the peacebuilders you’re interested in partnering with. Make sure that the partnership is a good match, make your expectations clear, and seek compromises to help achieve what they have in mind, as well.

You might think your money gives you the upper hand, but many organizations are more than willing to walk away if it means keeping their vision intact.

Next Article

How to Live Happily Ever After (Socially Speaking) in Japan’s High-Context Culture

Non-Japanese visitors and residents often find Japanese unspoken cultural norms frustrating. But there’s a secret to decoding Japan’s high-context culture.
Black-and-white image of Japanese people riding escalators with strict etiquette to stand on the right side, observing a high-context culture

Koa: Building a User-First Fintech Startup in an Emerging Market

Koa, a Kenya-based fintech startup, is rising fast to offer financial services in Africa. Their secret: prioritizing user feedback and remaining agile.
Illustration of how a fintech start-up leverages all kinds of financial data and smartphone technology

Braving Conflict Abroad to Support Emerging Markets for a Better Future

Tomohiro Kuwabara discovered his personal mission to support emerging markets in some of the world’s most turbulent environments. War, famine, and failing infrastructure were just a few obstacles he would face.
an illustration conveying the importance of investing in emerging markets

Invest in learning how your peacebuilding partners operate.

If your corporation is (as it likely is) located in a stable, developed economy, it’s hard to imagine the situation on the ground where peacebuilding is most needed. It’s not enough to leave things to the experts—take the initiative to educate yourself and your staff.

In a system known as ryushoku in Japan (or international corporate volunteering in the US), a company sends employees to NPOs or other organizations focused on social impact. In doing so, the company provides their employee with an experience outside of their typical role, enabling unique skill development. The receiving organization also benefits from additional human resources, ideas, and business-minded skill sets.

Ultimately, ryushoku creates a trusting relationship between corporations and peacebuilding organizations. As trust is built, doors will open for further cooperation, such as financial investment from corporate donors.

The ryushoku system is especially valuable for developing young talent, says Sasaki: “Corporations can support passionate young people with generous investment and funding. It is a win-win situation in the long term that will benefit the population and, in turn, the economy.”

Bridging the Gap between Peacebuilding and Profit

Sasaki stresses that, however you support SDG 16, results may be slow. But they will also ripple across generations, not unlike the story of a Korean fisherman who rescued a drowning Japanese man.

And at some point, says Sasaki, it requires faith.

“When corporations build an ecosystem where investments in peacebuilding initiatives are based on a faith-over-data mentality, they will begin to understand the amount of work that goes into peacebuilding. They can also encourage their staff to volunteer their skill sets and be an active participant in the peacebuilding work, which will in turn build a relationship of trust between the corporation and peacebuilding organization.”

Promoting peace in every sector on a global scale, she says, is the only way to achieve a peaceful society—and, by extension, economic stability.

Connect with Insights

Trouble keeping up with all the insights? Subscribe to our newsletter for monthly career inspiration right in your inbox!
Your newsletter subscription with us is subject to the GLOBIS Privacy Policy.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here