Servant Leadership

There's more to leadership than driving a team to profit. In fact, there's a word for looking beyond self-interest to prioritize individual growth: servant leadership. Try this course for a quick breakdown of what that is, how it works, and how it can lead to organizational success.

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

Ever wonder what makes a great leader? Whether your role requires leadership or not, understanding organizational behavior is useful for your career. This course from GLOBIS Unlimited can set you on your way.

Leadership vs. Management

Leadership and management are different skills, but today’s leaders must have both. Try out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to understand the difference, as well as when and why each skill is necessary for motivation, communication, and value.

Strategy: Creating Value Inside Your Company

Have you ever wondered why certain companies are more successful than others? The answer is strategy: internal processes that control costs, allocate resources, and create value. This course from GLOBIS Unlimited can give you the tools you need for that strategic edge.

Strategy: Understanding the External Environment

To plan strategy on any level, you need to understand your company's external environment. In fact, your level of understanding can impact hiring, budgeting, marketing, or nearly any other part of the business world. Want to learn how to do all that? This course from GLOBIS Unlimited is the perfect first step!

Using Japanese Values to Thrive in Global Business

Japanese companies have unique cultural, communication, and operational challenges. But they also have values that have led to remarkable longevity. Check out this seminar to hear how these values help earn trust from overseas head offices and develop employees.

Turnaround Leadership: The Differences Between Japan and the West

What's the best way for leaders to communicate a shift in corporate strategy? How do you even know when it's time for such a change? This course explains how Japan might have one answer, Western companies another.

Conflict Management

Conflicts in the workplace are inevitable. But they can lead to positive outcomes if they’re managed well. Check out this online course for a two-step process that can help you manage conflict successfully.

Evernote Founder: How Tech Startups Can Break through in Japan

Can startup models from Hollywood and Silicon Valley succeed anywhere? Phil Libin, cofounder and CEO of startup incubator All Turtles, explains how AI can solve everyday problems to bring products to market.

Women Empowerment: Lessons from Cartier

How can women overcome gender inequality and reach their leadership goals? Cartier Japan CEO June Miyachi shares her secret in this special course from GLOBIS Unlimited.

Marketing: Reaching Your Target

Every company works hard to get its products into the hands of customers. Are you doing everything you can to compete? In this course, you’ll find a winning formula to turn a product idea into real sales. Follow along through the fundamentals of the marketing mix and see how companies successfully bring products to market.

Marketing Mix

Seeing good products into the hands of customers is no easy task. The marketing mix can help. It's a collection of strategies and tactics companies utilize to get customers to purchase their products or services, and is an essential part of the overall marketing process.

The Principles of Negotiation

With the proper skills and attitude, anyone can become a successful negotiator.  But first, you'll need to learn the basics to prepare for, assess, and respond to offers for the best results. GLOBIS Unlimited can help.

Negotiation: Creating Value

Want to create more shared value between yourself and your negotiation opponent? Discover how cognitive bias affects the judgment of others. Try this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to master the value of negotiation.

Finding Your Life Purpose with Ikigai

Ikigai can guide you in your quest for self-discovery. Listen to Japanese brain scientist Ken Mogi explain why and how.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Want to leverage Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a leader? Try this short course to see how the theory can be applied in practical work scenarios.

Confirmation Bias

We all subconsciously collect information that reinforces our preconceptions. It's natural . . . but it does lead to a kind of flawed decision-making called confirmation bias. To become more objective and impartial, check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited!

An Investor's Lesson to Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurs have the power to transform societies for the better. But how do you attract investors to start or grow a business? Or to sell one? Check out this seminar for the answers to these and more, straight from a master venture capitalist!

Managerial Accounting

Managerial accounting is a powerful way to measure progress, identify problems, and meet your goals. Check out this course to learn how data-backed decisions can help you run your business.

Finance Basics: 1

For a healthy mix of quantitative planning, evaluation, and management, you need solid decision-making. And finance is the secret sauce! Get the essentials of finance in this two-part course from GLOBIS Unlimited.

Basic Accounting: Financial Analysis

Want to compare your performance vs. a competitor? Or evaluate a potential vendor? Then you'll need to conduct a financial analysis. This course will teach you how to use three financial statements and evaluate financial performance in terms of profitability, efficiency, soundness, growth, and overall strength.

Career Anchors

What drives you to be good at your job?

Career anchors are based on your values, desires, motivations, and abilities. They are the immovable parts of your professional self-image that guide you throughout your career journey.

Try this short GLOBIS Unlimited course to identify which of the eight career anchors is yours!

Digital Marketing Psychology to Transform Your Business

How does digital marketing really differ from traditional marketing? How is social media changing things really? And what's going on in Asia?

Pyramid Structure

Having the pyramid structure in your communication toolkit can not only help you approach a problem, but convince others that your solution is valid. Break away from linear thinking and test your logical thinking with this course from GLOBIS Unlimited!

Leadership with Passion through Kokorozashi

The key ingredient to success? Passion.

Finding your kokorozashi will unify your passions and skills to create positive change in society. This GLOBIS Unlimited course will help you develop the values and lifelong goals you need to become a strong, passion-driven leader.

AI First Companies – Implementation and Impact

AI is changing the way companies operate. How do you structure teams to increase efficiency?

Technovate in the Era of Industry 4.0

Is Industry 4.0 is the next step of human evolution human civilization? Dr. Jorge Calvo seems to think so. Join him to learn how the past can help you set goals for an exciting future of digital innovation.

Technovate Thinking

Business leaders of tomorrow need to harness the power of technology and innovation. That means understanding algorithms and how they drive business results. Discover opportunities to make technology work for your competitive edge.

Product Life Cycle

Every product takes a natural course through the market—there's a how, when, and why customers adopt products at different stages. Check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited to find out how a product you use every day is part of this cycle.

Logic Tree

Logical thinking is the most valuable asset any business professional can have. That's why logic trees are such a valuable tool—they can help you identify a problem, break it down, and build it back up to a solution.

MECE Principle

Using the MECE principle can help ensure you categorize without gaps or overlaps. Check out this course from GLOBIS Unlimited for a practical demonstration of how it works!

Yoshito Hori, president of GLOBIS University, managing partner of GLOBIS Capital Partners, shares his views from an entrepreneur’s perspective.

In 2015, lifestyle magazine Monocle selected Tokyo as the world’s most livable city, praising its “quality of life for visitors and people who live there, and its combination of culture, security, food and courtesy.”

Readers of travel magazine Travel + Leisure also voted Kyoto the world’s best city for tourists for the second year running.

Tourists love Japan and they are coming here in ever-greater numbers. That’s a simple matter of fact.

The Japanese government should pass its target of “20 million inbound tourists by 2020” this year—four years ahead of schedule—after getting more than 19 million tourists in 2015.

And Japan should remain in the limelight for several years to come. We are hosting the Rugby World Cup in 2019, and the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo in 2020.

In fact, the whole northeast Asia region is getting in on the act. The Winter Olympics will be held in PyeongChang, South Korea, in 2018, and in Beijing, China, in 2022.

With the exception of the soccer World Cup, Asia will be hosting every major global sporting event between 2018 and 2022. The region is becoming a hub for sports, leisure and culture.

Sports can have a geopolitical impact. Think of the 2002 soccer World Cup. The tournament represented a tipping point for the Korea-Japan relationship. After Japan was knocked out in the second round, many Japanese switched to support the Korean team, their traditional enemy, as fellow Asians. The Koreans—to everyone’s amazement—got as far as the semi-finals before finally losing to Germany.

If sports can have a positive impact on the diplomatic front, then tourism can have a positive impact on the economic front.

I’m not talking here simply about the money that tourists spend. I’m talking about how tourists’ desires and demands can help to rejuvenate rigid and over-regulated markets in the countries they visit.

For instance, did you know that the service provided by accommodation-rental site Airbnb is technically illegal in Japan? Unlicensed private homeowners are not allowed to accept paying visitors. The same is true with taxi apps like Uber: unlicensed drivers are not allowed to offer rides for money.

Nonetheless, many of the foreign tourists who come to Japan are finding their accommodation through Airbnb (Japan is actually Airbnb’s fastest-growing market) and getting around in Uber taxis. These markets are functioning despite existing in a legal gray area.  

The government recognizes this, and it wants to use tourist demand as a lever with which to get rid of out-of-date regulations and business practices.

Step one was to bring in more tourists. The government’s decision to abolish or relax visa requirements for many Asian countries led directly to a surge in visitor numbers starting in 2013.

Step two was to respond to those tourists’ desires for accommodation, transport, wi-fi and so on in a pragmatic fashion. The existence of special economic zones—of which Tokyo is one—makes this easier because they allow rigid national laws to be sidestepped and new models to be experimented with.

Here are some examples.

Ota ward, the district closest to Tokyo’s Haneda airport, has legalized Airbnb. (Shibuya ward, again in Tokyo, has legalized LGBT marriage, though I don’t think this is yet having an impact on tourist numbers!)

Kyoto has established a citywide network of wi-fi hotspots so tourists can stay connected without having to pay costly data roaming charges. Like several other Japanese cities, it also has a system of 4-language signage (Japanese, Chinese, Korean and English).

Fukuoka—which is situated closer to Seoul than to Tokyo—is consciously trying to build itself up as an Asian Gateway, making it easier for overseas professionals to come in and establish their own businesses with a special startup visa.

However, the thing that really seems to impress tourists to Japan is nothing to do with efforts of national or local government. What most impresses tourists is the level of honesty, courtesy and consideration exhibited by ordinary Japanese people.

China Weibo, China’s answer to Twitter, is awash with so-called “incredible stories” about Japan—heartwarming tales about people getting back iPhones they forgot in taxis and on trains; stories about people getting mislaid wallets returned to them with all the money still inside.

Tourists seem to love watching Japanese orderliness on display, whether at the frantic early-morning fish auctions at Tsukiji market or at the world-famous scramble crossing at Shibuya (as seen in “Lost in Translation.”)

Ironically, then, while the Japanese government spent a ton of money promoting a “Cool Japan” of anime, manga and music, what really appealed to foreign tourists was something more traditional: Japanese values of honesty, attention to detail, diligence and professionalism.

So foreign tourists are clearly getting something out of their visits to Japan.

But it’s a symbiotic relationship. We, the Japanese, are getting something out of tourists coming here too. Their needs, desires and demands are helping to bring in new products and services; to reshape Japan as a genuinely cosmopolitan country; even to improve our relationships with countries like China and Korea.

So come on over to Japan for your next holiday. Take part in this process of positive transformation. My country needs YOU!

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