How to Dream

Join globally renowned author and Columbia Business School professor Dr. Sheena Iyengar as she explains how to approach your dreams with a new perspective. Learn to reflect on what you long to accomplish and what stands in your way.

Leadership with Passion through Kokorozashi

The key ingredient to success? Passion.

Finding your kokorozashi will unify your passions and skills to create positive change in society. This GLOBIS Unlimited course will help you develop the values and lifelong goals you need to become a strong, passion-driven leader.

Building a meaningful career can sometimes feel impossible. Common advice is to pursue your passion. But what do you do if you haven’t discovered your passion in life?

GLOBIS University helps students find their passion through a kokorozashi (personal mission) framework. At this seminar, we check in with some alumni to learn how studying this framework helped them find both their passions and meaningful work.

GLOBIS MBA alumni Brandon Tatum, Saskia Rock, and Tiffany Yitang Guo joined GLOBIS USA President Tomoya Nakamura to reflect on how they each found their aspirations, how finding their aspirations affected their lives, and how the GLOBIS MBA program helped them find their kokorozashi.

Below is a transcript of the session, edited for clarity. Watch the video above for the rest of their discussion and an audience Q&A.  

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How did you use your kokorozashi to build a meaningful career?

Saskia Rock:

I would say, find your kokorozashi, but don’t pin yourself down. And be successful for the right reason.

Leadership with Passion through Kokorozashi

The key ingredient to success? Passion.

Finding your kokorozashi will unify your passions and skills to create positive change in society. This GLOBIS Unlimited course will help you develop the values and lifelong goals you need to become a strong, passion-driven leader.

Tomoya Nakamura:

Find your kokorozashi, but don’t pin it down. Leave some room to maneuver or change?

Rock:

Yes, because life changes, as we now saw with the last two years. Who expected this [pandemic], right? I was about to start my own business again in the United States, and I had to shelve that because it was not viable. Everything worked out in the end because I kept my eyes open. Now I work with this incredible company.

I’m so happy to have landed here because it opened my eyes to mental wellbeing in a way I never thought about before. It’s just like being in class with Brandon, my first experience with people of color opened my eyes to something completely new.

Now I’m in the mental space, and it’s so important. So many people, especially here in the United States, and I guess also in Japan, are unhappy and becoming sick. It’s all because there is something missing in your alignment with yourself, or with the people around you.

I think I’m just continuing my path, and I’m learning more and more. I’m so grateful for GLOBIS and all the people that brought me these things and helped me to evolve.

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Brandon Tatum:

Recently, a lot of people have reached out to me on LinkedIn. Once you achieve a certain level of success and people think you have a certain level of experience, they begin to reach out.

People would ask me, “How did you do this? How did you go from where you came from, go to Japan, and work in Korea? You’re the first Black person to work at SM Entertainment. How do you do these things? How did you go about it, and what are your ways of success?”

I started coming up with habits of success that I would post as stories on Instagram. I think I came up with five, but I would like to read the fourth one. “My habit of success, number four. Believe in yourself deeply.”

This should perhaps be habit number one. At one point or another when chasing big dreams, we are prone to start doubting ourselves once we reach certain barriers or obstacles. Some are more prone to self-disbelief than others.

In fact, some people don’t believe in themselves from the very inception of their dream or goal, so they just let it go without ever trying, or they give it a half-hearted try that was never truly intended to lead to success.

How to Dream

Join globally renowned author and Columbia Business School professor Dr. Sheena Iyengar as she explains how to approach your dreams with a new perspective. Learn to reflect on what you long to accomplish and what stands in your way.

It is precisely when you hit those barriers and obstacles that you must reaffirm your deep belief in yourself. You are entirely capable of anything you put your mind to and commit to doing. Your imagination is a window into the future if you believe you can make it happen.

When you set a big goal and you deeply believe you can and will achieve it, then you act with true intention to do exactly that. You accept that there will be distractions. You accept that there are pressures of time, resources, and other external pressures, but you believe that you can envision and pursue a path that will get you to your goal, and then you walk that path and adjust as needed.

That’s my advice. It all comes down to you actually believing in yourself at the end of the day.

If you set a kokorozashi, if you set a goal, you set a dream. If you don’t believe in it, you can’t expect anybody else to, and I think that’s where it needs to start—self-belief.

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Tiffany Yitang Guo:

I saw people in the chat ask, “What if I don’t have a kokorozashi?”

I think it’s okay that you don’t have a kokorozashi for now, but you might want to keep trying. So many things happen in life. Good or bad, all of them could be something that helps you to find your kokorozashi.

You just have to put yourself out there, be brave and keep experiencing new things, and keep trying. Then I think eventually you’ll find your kokorozashi, which will be the reason that you want to do something.

I still remember this concept that Nakamura-sensei taught us in class. It’s called synchronicity. Once you have a kokorozashi, you’ll find your reason. Then you need ability. You need the skill set. Those are the things that I got from GLOBIS. GLOBIS gave me the skill set to make my kokorozashi come true.

Then the last piece is chance. When you have the right timing, you’re lucky, and then everything at that moment will sync together. Then your dream might come true.

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