Takashi Mitachi
Takashi Mitachi
Co-Chairman Japan, The Boston Consulting Group
Takashi Mitachi is a Co-Chairman Japan of the Boston Consulting Group. He holds an MBA with high distinction (Baker Scholar) from Harvard Business School and a BA in American literature from the University of Kyoto. Before joining BCG, he worked for JAL for 14 years, including a position as Manager of Corporate Planning at the Tokyo head office. In 1993 he joined the Boston Consulting Group and currently is a Co-Chairman of the Japan office and a member of BCG's Worldwide Executive Committee. He has led projects for both Japanese and multinational clients in a wide range of industries. He has been a member of Japan General Agenda Council of World Economic Forum, a Chairman of Committee on Medical and Welfare Business of Keizai Doyuukai (Japan Association of Corporate Executives), a Chairman of Airport Restructuring Taskforce of Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transportation and Tourism, a Board member to Japan Association of World Food Program and a regular commentator on World Business Satellite. He is an author of books such as "The BCG Way - The Art of Strategic Insight", available in Japanese and Korean and "Tsukau Chikara (being able to apply)", on leveraging knowledge and skills to achieve results.
Thanks to the growing Asian middle class and favorable policy changes such...

Can Inbound Tourism Boost Japan’s Economy?

Thanks to the growing Asian middle class and favorable policy changes such...
By Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshiaki Fujimori, Takashi Mitachi and Nik...

Boosting Innovation and Dynamism: Can Japanese Companies Survive in Global Competition?

By Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshiaki Fujimori, Takashi Mitachi and Nik...
3/11 posed a major challenge for the Japanese economy. This was especially true for the manufacturing sector, where exports still remain the crux of the country’ s economic growth. As the situation improves, what should companies do?

Rebuilding Japan

3/11 posed a major challenge for the Japanese economy. This was especially true for the manufacturing sector, where exports still remain the crux of the country’ s economic growth. As the situation improves, what should companies do?