Nik Gowing
Nik Gowing
International Broadcaster, BBC
Visiting Professor, Kings College London

Mr. Gowing was a main news presenter for the BBC’s international 24-hour news channel BBC World News from 1996 to 2014. He presented The Hub with Nik Gowing, BBC World Debates, Dateline London, and location coverage of major global stories.
For eighteen years, he worked at ITN, where he was bureau chief in Rome and Warsaw, as well as diplomatic editor for Channel Four News. He has been a member of the councils of Chatham House, the Royal United Services Institute, and the Overseas Development Institute; the board of the Westminster Foundation for Democracy; and the advisory council at Wilton Park. In 1994, he was a fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Barone Center in the JF Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

Mr. Gowing's extensive reporting experience spans three decades in diplomacy, defense, and international security. He also has much sought-after analytical expertise on the failures to manage information in conflicts, crises, emergencies, and other times of tension. His peer-reviewed study at Oxford University, “Skyful of Lies and Black Swans,” predicts and identifies the new vulnerability, fragility, and brittleness of institutional power in the new, all-pervasive public information space. In 2016, he co-authored interim findings of the “Thinking the Unthinkable” study, based on sixty top-level confidential interviews of corporate and public service leaders, as well as hundreds more conversations with millennials.

In 2014, he was appointed a visiting professor at Kings College, London in the School of Social Science and Public Policy and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Geo-Economics. In 2016, he became a visiting professor at Nanyang University, Singapore. He was awarded honorary doctorates by Exeter University in 2012 and Bristol University in 2015 for both his ongoing cutting edge analyses and distinguished career in international journalism.

Leadership: Thinking the Unthinkable

Panelists engage in what must be done to confront “unthinkables.”
Panelists engage in what must be done to confront “unthinkables.”

“Leadership: Thinking the Unthinkable” Nik Gowing Keynote Speech

Former BBC broadcaster Nik Gowing shares his research on the theme: "Leadership: Thinking the Unthinkable."
Former BBC broadcaster Nik Gowing shares his research on the theme: "Leadership: Thinking the Unthinkable."

Boosting Innovation and Dynamism: Can Japanese Companies Survive in Global Competition?

By Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshiaki Fujimori, Takashi Mitachi and Nik...
By Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshiaki Fujimori, Takashi Mitachi and Nik...

Towards 2020: How Should Japan Navigate its Politics and Economy?

By Yoshimasa Hayashi, Heizo Takenaka and Nik Gowing. < Session Title...
By Yoshimasa Hayashi, Heizo Takenaka and Nik Gowing. < Session Title...

Talking (or Not Talking) about the Hard Issues of Fiscal Sustainability

Richard Solomon from Beacon Reports covered G1 Global Conference 2014. Here's how two resident experts on Japan's economy responded to the tax hike conundrum when asked "Is Abenomics in trouble?"
Richard Solomon from Beacon Reports covered G1 Global Conference 2014. Here's how two resident experts on Japan's economy responded to the tax hike conundrum when asked "Is Abenomics in trouble?"

A Stronger Japan: Impact on Asia and the World

By Yoshimasa Hayashi, Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshimasa Hayashi, Nik Gowing. <...
By Yoshimasa Hayashi, Robert Alan Feldman, Yoshimasa Hayashi, Nik Gowing. <...

New Models of Leadership: Japan and the World

This high-level interactive session is part of a series of Japan’s global advisory meetings typically held at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos.
This high-level interactive session is part of a series of Japan’s global advisory meetings typically held at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos.

Rebuilding Japan

3/11 posed a major challenge for the Japanese economy. This was especially true for the manufacturing sector, where exports still remain the crux of the country’ s economic growth. As the situation improves, what should companies do?
3/11 posed a major challenge for the Japanese economy. This was especially true for the manufacturing sector, where exports still remain the crux of the country’ s economic growth. As the situation improves, what should companies do?